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Cruz Smith, Martin. ROSE - MacMillan 1996

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Rose by Martin Cruz Smith. 1996 - MacMillan. For sale is a first edition, first printing. fine used hardback book in a very good dust jacket.

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Cruz Smith, Martin.  ROSE  -  MacMillan 1996

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The Book 'Rose' In Detail


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For sale is a fine copy of the novel, Rose by Martin Cruz Smith, published in 1996 by MacMillan.

Edition Details

Title Rose
Author Martin Cruz Smith
Publisher MacMillan
Edition First UK edition, first printing
Copyright Year 1996
ISBN 0333632923
Cover Price 16.99
No. Pages 407
Dimensions 24 cm x 16 cm
Weight (kg) 0.75

The book is a first edition, first printing as evidenced by a full numberline on the copyright page.

The book has black boards and silver lettering. The boards have no knocks or signs of wear. Internally there are no marks or inscriptions. The pages are clean and white, have no tears or creases, and the binding is tight and square.

The very good dust jacket is complete showing the original cover price of £16.99. It has minor wear to the upper edge.

Overall a fine copy of a novel by a popular author.

The book is not an ex library book, it has no remainder marks or publishers stamps.


Further Information

About the Author

Bio

Author Picture

Martin Cruz Smith

Martin Cruz Smith is the author of Gorky Park, as well as Stallion Gate, Polar Star and Rose, among other novels.

He lives in California with his wife and three children.



Synopsis of this title

The year is 1872. The place is Wigan, England, a coal town where rich mine owners live lavishly alongside miners no better than slaves. Into this dark, complicated world comes Jonathan Blair, who has accepted a commission to find a missing man.

When he begins his search every road leads back to one woman, a haughty, vixenish pit girl named Rose. With her fiery hair and skirts pinned up over trousers, she cares nothing for a society that calls her unnatural, scandalous, erotic.

As Rose and Blair circle one another, first warily, then with the heat of mutual desire, Blair loses his balance. And the lull induced by Rose's sensual touch leaves him unprepared for the bizarre, soul-scorching truth. . . .

Reviews of this title

quotes

Publishers Weekly
Though Arkady Renko is absent from Smith's latest novel, the author of Red Square (1992), etc., has created instead a new protagonist, Jonathan Blair, a 19th-century man in the best muscular detective tradition. Until 1872, Blair was an avid explorer of Africa's Gold Coast, but now he has been exiled by his employer, Bishop Hannay, to the Lancashire mining town of Wigan. Blair's ostensible mission is to find John Rowland, the missing curate who was engaged to Hannay's daughter, but he quickly learns that he'll need all his bush survival skills just to stay alive in Wigan, where no one seems to want the curate found. Much of Blair's gritty charm lies in his hatred of all things English, just as he is hated in turn by the aristocratic Hannays, their peer relations, the Rowlands-and the miners. On the first day of his investigation, Blair steps on nearly every toe in a very touchy town, including those of Bill Jaxon, a miner skilled at a blood sport in which naked men fight with brass-studded clogs. Blair ends up on the wrong end of a clog more than once when he intuits that Jaxon's 'pit girl' (a woman who sorts coal) may have lured the curate to his doom. Smith molds a spirited, sexy mystery and fires it with his characteristic love of atmosphere. But his real treat for readers is Blair, whose spicy observations imbue even this gray landscape with prismatic color, and whose verbal sparring matches with the Hannays and Rowlands are equal to Waugh in their hilarious, scathing send-up of English upper-class incivility. Smith's extravagant talent runs the spectrum here from sparkling dialogue and tantalizing mystery to grim, graphic depictions of mining life that sear both the conscience and the imagination.


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